“When I was working around 35mm film I collected bits and pieces of it. I couldn’t help it. I didn’t know what to do with them until it occurred to me to make a film that showed them while I talked about them. Standard Gauge is a film of fragments: what you see are fragments and the narration is fragments of an autobiography and fragments of film history and technology. But the film presents these fragments in one continuous shot.” — Morgan Fisher

Morgan Fisher Main Work
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works

“The basis of this work was the principle of complements. Complements are two things that make a whole; simply put, complements are a pair. Male and female are conventional complements, and the objects in the photographs have conventional associations with them. And complements are present in the pairs of colors in each photograph: red and green, orange and blue. Complements express a relation of contrast, and the work enacts this by being in two parts. Their being the same size embodies the equality that complements usually imply. Each part is not the other, but each requires the other to complete it. These are the only photographs I have ever shown.” — Morgan Fisher

Morgan Fisher Other Works

“Color Balance uses the same principle of color reproduction that video projectors use. Three beams of light – red, blue, and green – converge on the screen to reproduce the image. But in Color Balance the frames are out of register with each other. By conventional standards this is an error, but Color Balance relies on the interaction among the images that it produces. Color Balance has no beginning or end, it just goes on and on.” — Morgan Fisher

Morgan Fisher Other Works

The text on the rotating alarm reminded me of Duchamp’s Anemic Cinema. The Wilkinson Household Fire Alarm is seemingly inadequate to the task it was designed to perform. It occurred to me only afterwards that it could be an example of what Duchamp called a sick readymade.” — Morgan Fisher

Morgan Fisher Other Works

“In the hall near the office where I worked in the late sixties was a Pepsi machine, and with it were some wooden Pepsi cases. A Pepsi case combined several of my interests then. They were a pop subject, and they were a grid, a standard device in modernist work. The blueprint and Xerox are from a drawing done in isometric, a kind of technical drawing that interested me because it drastically limits how you can depict the object. The dimensions are those of the actual object, modified by turning it into a hyperbolic paraboloid, a shape I admired because in it straight lines produce (surprisingly, to me) a surface that curves in two directions.” — Morgan Fisher

Morgan Fisher Other Works
Morgan Fisher Other Works